Glottal Stops in Cockney

Glottal Stops in Cockney

AUDIO KEY: Cockney (bold), Standard (italic)

Cockney, which is spoken in East London and Essex, contains a lot of glottal stops. In words like WATER, FITTING and ROTA – where ’t’ appears between 2 vowel sounds, you’ll hear [ʔ]. 

In standard pronunciation, /t/ is pronounced between vowel sounds: WATER, FITTING and ROTA. 

Listen and decide if the sentences are pronounced in standard (GB) or cockney (CKN):

1. Waiter, a pint of water, please.  GB  CKN

2. Have you got a lighter?           GB  CKN

3. Tonight’s the hottest night.      GB  CKN

4. What a great artist               GB  CKN

5. Pat isn’t assertive at all.       GB  CKN

6. What beautiful writing!           GB  CKN

7. It isn’t wet at the moment.       GB  CKN

8. This pattern’s complicated.       GB  CKN

Answers & Audio

1. women
2. once
3. again
4. business
5. says
6. does
7. friend
8. built
9. flood
10. sausage

 

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TH Fronting

TH Fronting

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/ʊə/ – Modern vs Traditional

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American vs British < er >

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/ʊə/

/ʊə/

/ʊə/Security during the tournament was poor.The plural of tour is surely ‘tours’. Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons

Diphthong Expressions

Diphthong Expressions

1. “so so” /əʊ/ 2. “pay day” /eɪ/ 3. “hear hear” /ɪə/ 4. “high time” /ʌɪ/ 5. “out and out” /aʊ/ 6. “hoity toity” /ɔɪ/     Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons

Diphthong Vowel Word Construction

Diphthong Vowel Word Construction

- Make 2 (or more) common words by placing diphthong sounds in the gaps:1. /b_t/    2. /n_/    nay, neigh /neɪ/ nigh /nʌɪ/ no, know /nəʊ/ now /aʊ/ near /ɪə/ 3. /fl_/    flay /fleɪ/ fly /flʌɪ/ flow /fləʊ/ 4. /pl_/    play /pleɪ/ ploy /plɔɪ/ ply /plʌɪ/ plough /plaʊ/ 5....

/ɔɪ/

/ɔɪ/

/ɔɪ/The annoying noises spoilt the boy’s joy. My choice as employer is to appoint Floyd. Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons

/ʌɪ/

/ʌɪ/

/ʌɪ/ Fine wine and light bites tonight. I dislike high and mighty types. Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons

/əʊ/

/əʊ/

/əʊ/ No, don’t moan over the phone. Although the road is soaked, he’ll go. Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons

Endings

Endings

– Find the pronunciation of each < ed > ending in the transcriptions:

Answer

played = /d/
stopped = /t/
recorded = /ɪd/

<ed> endings are pronounced:

      /d/ after a voiced sound (stayed, judged).
/t/ after a voiceless sound (finished, watched).
/ɪd/ after /t/ or /d/ (wanted, faded).

– Is the < s > ending pronounced /s/ or /z/ in each word?

Answers & Audio

/t/

shopped ripped messed fished washed fetched licked trekked

/d/

poured bailed booed sewed pleased arranged loaned robbed

/ɪd/

afforded boasted raided bloated needed carted herded alluded

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Glottal Stops in Cockney

Glottal Stops in Cockney

AUDIO KEY: Cockney (bold), Standard (italic) Cockney, which is spoken in East London and Essex, contains a lot of glottal stops. In words like WATER, FITTING and ROTA - where ’t’ appears between 2 vowel sounds, you’ll hear [ʔ].  In standard pronunciation, /t/ is...

Endings

Endings

- Find the pronunciation of each < ed > ending in the transcriptions: played = /d/stopped = /t/recorded = /ɪd/ <ed> endings are pronounced:       /d/ after a voiced sound (stayed, judged). /t/ after a voiceless sound (finished, watched). /ɪd/ after /t/ or...

/t/ vs [ʔ]

/t/ vs [ʔ]

- Which < t > is pronounced differently? The < t > in ‘lightning’ is pronounced differently: LIGHT /lʌɪt/ LIGHTNING /ˈlʌɪʔnɪŋ/ LIGHTER /ˈlʌɪtə/ When /t/ is at the end of a syllable and the next sound is a consonant, /t/ can be pronounced [ʔ] in connected...

Silent Letters (Plosives)

Silent Letters (Plosives)

- Match each IPA transcription to its picture:Previous & Next Lessons ← [ʔ] /t/ vs [ʔ] → Related Lessons

/ʔ/

/ʔ/

[ʔ] In a nutshell, not many cat flaps have white doors. Lightning isn’t common in Hertfordshire or Wiltshire. Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons

/tʃ,dʒ/

/tʃ,dʒ/

/tʃ,dʒ/ This jam jar is actually attached to the fridge. Which butcher suggested pigeon for lunch? Previous & Next Lessons ← /k,g/ [ʔ] → Related Lessons

/k,g/

/k,g/

/k,g/ Look, quite a good example of a blog on crime fiction. Kate’s Greek guests came back craving English cuisine. Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons

/t,d/

/t,d/

/t,d/ Tonight, let’s spend some time doing not a lot at all. David’s debts spiralled out of control until he sought advice. Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons

/p,b/

/p,b/

/p,b/ Pick up a blue umbrella before departing. Playing piggy backs at the party absorbed the boys completely. Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons

/t/ vs [ʔ]

/t/ vs [ʔ]

– Which < t > is pronounced differently?

Answer

The < t > in ‘lightning’ is pronounced differently:

LIGHT /lʌɪt/
LIGHTNING /ˈlʌɪʔnɪŋ/
LIGHTER /ˈlʌɪtə/

When /t/ is at the end of a syllable and the next sound is a consonant, /t/ can be pronounced [ʔ] in connected speech.
This occurs within words (lightning) and between words (it was).

– Which < t > could be pronounced [ʔ] in each sentence?

Answers & Audio

The < t > that could be pronounced [ʔ] is underlined:

1. It was true!
2. Time to get back!
3. What type of cat is it?
4. Can’t I sit here?
5. Talk about wasting water! 

6. Absolutely not!

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< a > – BATH TRAP Split

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Diphthong Vowel Sounds – Spelling to Sound

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Reduced Vowels (Spelling to Sound)

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Reduced Vowels

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- Listen and decide which word has the shortest /iː/ sound:seed/siːd/seat/siːt/sea/siː/SEAT is the shortest /iː/SEED is the longest /iː/Long vowel sounds are shortened if the following sound is a voiceless consonant: /p,t,k,f,θ,s,ʃ,tʃ/.These are known as reduced...

Long Vowel Sounds – Spelling to Sound

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- Choose the long vowel sound for each word:half search reach flare soon lawn worth fruit shark move door chair drew charm fairy sheet hurt sought eve journal bath tore niece  first fall scene wear route hard vary /iː/ reach sheet eve niece scene /uː/ soon fruit move...

/ɑː/

/ɑː/

/ɑː/ It can’t harm to laugh harder. Aren’t you on after Lance’s father? Previous & Next LessonsRelated Lessons

/ɔː/

/ɔː/

/ɔː/Sort the balls in order of importance. Divorce law is always a chore. Previous & Next LessonsRelated Lessons

/əː/

/əː/

/əː/ Firstly, it’s worth learning the words. But sir, I heard you weren’t returning. Previous & Next LessonsRelated Lessons

/ɛː/

/ɛː/

/ɛː/ I swear the parents cared for their welfare. Where’s the fair haired mare? Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons

/iː/

/iː/

/iː/ I need sleep and a decent meal. Please eat your greens, Steven. Previous & Next Lessons Related Lessons